Category Archives: elections

The Whistle Blows for Trump

I won’t even try to fight it, as I did in my last blog. Now the whistleblower’s complaint has been released and so was a summary memo describing the telephone conversation Donald Trump had with the President of Ukraine.

Please, I beg you. READ the complaint and the telephone call memo. Make up your own mind. Beware the pundits and the spinners. Even me. It remains both inexplicable and frustrating to me that two people can look at the same material and come to different conclusions. But that’s life. What I can’t abide is people voicing an opinion without having read the material. Each document is only a handful of pages long. Make the effort.

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Why is it so hard?

I think I’ve figured out why it is so hard to get these blogs written. I have a routine. I’ll have an idea, spend half a day thinking about it and doing any necessary research. Then I’ll spend the afternoon writing. Then I sleep on it and the next morning, edit it with fresh eyes and look for a visual or two to insert. Easy, right?

The problem is I keep writing about Donald Trump. He dominates the news and my thoughts. I simply can’t believe what he says. I can’t believe what he does or tries to do. I can’t believe how many people passively remain quiet or openly support his actions. So I write. But overnight, he does something worse. Day in and day out. Now, come the morning, I’m faced with the dilemma, finish the piece from the day before, or drop everything to tackle the latest horror? I’m frozen in the headlights of Trump.

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Parliament: At Least Debate

One of the more esoteric debates in academia for those studying politics is the contrast between the American form of government, with a strong executive and an elected legislature wielding equal power, with the democratic parliamentary system in which the elected legislature is the ultimate power, the head of state subservient to it and the executive chosen by it. In other words, America v. England.

I frequently got into this debate with my father, a true Anglophile, and we never resolved the issue. The compare and contrast form of discussion was, in many way, ironic because of the historical circumstances. England had a strong executive at the time of the American revolution. King George III reigned at that time, had considerable real power compared with today’s Queen Elizabeth II, and was for Americans the perfect example of a leader to be avoided.

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Guns

On September 13, 1994, a ten-year ban on assault weapons was signed into law by President Bill Clinton. It had been supported by three former presidents, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reason. The law had a built-in “sunset” provision and was allowed to expire on September 13, 2004, when President George W. Bush was in office.

The so-called Federal Assault Weapons Ban, part of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, was limited. It included a prohibition on the manufacture for civilian use of certain semi-automatic firearms that were defined as assault weapons as well as certain ammunition magazines that were defined as “large capacity”.

Limited or not, it was too much for the Republicans and the National Rifle Association. Democratic attempts to renew it have failed repeatedly over the years. California Senator Diane Feinstein has led the effort in the Senate. Her bill is pending before the Judiciary Committees in both houses. There have been no hearings.

To be fair, yes, some opinion writers try to be, questions have been raised about the effectiveness of the law, at least during the first few years after it was enacted. And the legal environment for gun control legislation has become more complicated in recent years, in great part due to the Supreme Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller.

This 2008 opinion, decided 5-4 with  Scalia, Roberts, Kennedy, Thomas, and Alito in the majority, held for the first time that the Second Amendment gives private citizens the right to possess an ordinary type of weapon and use it for lawful, historically established purposes such as self-defense even when there is no relationship to a local militia.

A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

Second Amendment, U.S. Constitution

I can go on for hours, and have bored many a person doing so, about how ridiculous and hypocritical the Heller opinion, written by Justice Scalia, is. But I’ll spare you. For now. Suffice it to note the opinion, dangerous though it is, still allows for the possibility that some type of weapons could be banned. One hopes, for example, the Court would allow the prohibition of nuclear bombs in a home arsenal. Still untested however, is a new ban on assault weapons.

But before a new ban can be tested, Congress has to act.

Congress is taking August off.

The Shooters Don’t Wait

On Saturday it appears a single shooter killed 20 people and wounded 26 others at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas. Police say he carried an assault rifle of the type banned by the expired law. He was captured alive by police within minutes.

Dayton Shooting MagazineThirteen hours later another apparently lone gunman opened fire on people in downtown Dayton, Ohio. The gunman wore body armor and also used an “AK” type assault rifle. Police say he carried the “high capacity magazine” pictured on the left. It holds 100 rounds, is designed for rapid fire and would have been banned under the expired law. The gunman was killed by police in less than a minute after he started shooting. In that minute he killed 9 people and wounded at least 27 others.

If only Scalia, who frequently argued that the Constitution has to be understood in terms of what its actual words meant at the time they were written, had limited his individual right to bear arms to those highly inaccurate and slow firing weapons in use at that time. You can’t do much damage with a musket or flintlock.

Even Background Checks Can’t Be Enacted

The House of Representatives passed H.R.8, the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019 on February 27, 2019. The vote was 240 – 190. It is far from perfect. But it does establish new background check requirements for firearm transfers between private parties (i.e., unlicensed individuals). Specifically, it prohibits a firearm transfer between private parties unless a licensed gun dealer, manufacturer, or importer first takes possession of the firearm to conduct a background check.

On March 4, it was “Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 29.” Its fate now rests solely in the hands of Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell. It hasn’t been heard from since.

Congress is taking August off.

Most polls show a significant majority of Americans favor limits on high capacity, high speed weapons designed for military use. Most polls show a significant majority of Americans favor background checks.

Congress is taking August off.

Perhaps the solution is for voters to give members of Congress who block these measures a permanent vacation.

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Muller to Barr RE: “Public Confusion”

I didn’t. I really did not want to write about this again. I’ve got several much more interesting things half written that I’d like to finish. But I keep coming back to what is alleged by many to be the most popular quotation in the English language, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill? For a discussion on the source see quoteinvestigator.

The night before Attorney General William Barr was to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, the Washington Post first reported that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had, on March 27th, 2019, sent a letter to Barr characterizing Barr’s four page memo to Congress, dated March 24,

The summary letter the Department sent to Congress and released to the public late in the afternoon of March 24 did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance of this Office’s work and conclusions. We communicated that concern to the Department on the morning of March 25. There is now public confusion about critical aspects of the results of our investigation. This threatens to undermine a central purpose for which the Department appointed the Special Counsel: to assure full public confidence in the outcome of the investigations

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Bill Barr’s Balderdash

I know. In my last post I wrote that Attorney General William Barr is a political hack. But I hoped I was wrong. I really did hope the Mueller Report would reveal that Barr’s four page letter to Congress had been a fair representation, that the Mueller Report would put to rest accusations against Donald Trump and that the nation would get on with its business.

But those hopes were dashed even before Barr released a redacted version of the 448-page report on the Department of Justice web site.  A few hours ahead of the release Barr called a “news conference” to put his own spin, for the third time, on what reporters, members of the public and the Congress had yet to read. Barr’s repetition of the “no collusion,” “no obstruction” company line must have been music to Trump’s ears.

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RE: Barr Memo RE: Meuller Report

I thought we should wait to write about the Mueller Report until we had actually read it. Silly me.

We have now seen an incalculable amount of ink and airtime expended reporting on and analyzing the report by special counsel Robert Mueller into “any links and/or consultation between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump, and any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation.”

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